9 nights onboard MS Maud

Island Hopping in the North Atlantic - Edinburgh to Reykjavik

Winners 2022 Favourite Specialist Cruise Line
Formerly the MS Midnatsol, the MS Maud is well-suited for expedition cruising.
Leaving from: Edinburgh
Cruise ship: MS Maud
Visiting: Edinburgh Kirkwall, Orkney Islands North Haven, Fair Isle Shetland Islands
HX Hurtigruten Expeditions Logo
HX Hurtigruten Expeditions

Hurtigruten Expeditions offers more than 125 years of cruising experience, providing small-ship exploration of more than 250 destinations across 30-plus countries.

On Hurtigruten Expeditions cruise adventures, you will be accompanied by a highly skilled crew and expedition team on one of nine intimately-scaled expedition ships, taking you on breathtaking nature-based experiences in remote corners of the world.

822
Passengers
69
Crew
2002
Launched
2021
Last refit
16140t
Tonnage
135.75m
Length
21.5m
Width
15kts
Speed
7
Decks
NOK
Currency
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1
Edinburgh, Scotland
Embark.
Day 2
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
Day 3
North Haven, Fair Isle, Scotland
Day 3
Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 4
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Day 6
Thorshavn, Faroe Islands
Day 9
Heimaey Island, Iceland
Day 10
Reykjavík, Iceland
Disembark.
Edinburgh, Scotland image
Day 1
Edinburgh, Scotland

The magical city of Edinburgh has been captivating visitors for centuries and for good reason. Those new to Scotland’s legendary capital should head straight for its famed attractions, from Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace to the Royal Mile. Seasoned visitors, on the other hand, should consider venturing out of the city centre. The vibrant port neighbourhood of Leith is not just home to the city’s cruise terminal, but it’s also the place to sample some of the best seafood in Scotland, enjoy a waterside stroll or pay a visit to a local microbrewery. And you can’t go to Edinburgh without sampling a dram or two, so call in at The Scotch Whisky Experience on the famous Royal Mile for masterclasses and tastings. Summer visitors can enjoy world-class music, theatre and comedy during the renowned Edinburgh Festival. But there is truly no off season in this great city, and in winter the buzz and excitement around Christmas and Hogmanay make up for the fact that – as they say in these parts – it might be a ‘wee’ bit on the nippy side.

Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland image
Day 2
Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, Scotland
In bustling Kirkwall, the main town on Orkney, there's plenty to see in the narrow, winding streets extending from the harbor. The cathedral and some museums are highlights.
North Haven, Fair Isle, Scotland image
Day 3
North Haven, Fair Isle, Scotland
Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 3
Shetland Islands, Scotland
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland image
Day 4
Lerwick, Shetland Islands, Scotland
Founded by Dutch fishermen in the 17th century, Lerwick today is a busy town and administrative center. Handsome stone buildings—known as lodberries—line the harbor; they provided loading bays for goods, some of them illegal. The town's twisting flagstone lanes and harbor once heaved with activity, and Lerwick is still an active port today. This is also where most visitors to Shetland dock, spilling out of cruise ships, allowing passengers to walk around the town.
Thorshavn, Faroe Islands image
Day 6
Thorshavn, Faroe Islands
More than 600 miles (nearly 1,000 kilometres) from Denmark’s west coast lie the Faroes, a triangle of eighteen windswept islands, seventeen of which are inhabited. Only 48,500 people plus some 70,000 sheep roam these remote lands. Much of the islands’ heritage reflects a medieval past, beginning with the arrival of farmers from western Norway who settled here in the 9th century. Evidence of this Scandinavian heritage is preserved through centuries of isolation; ancient structures can still be seen in villages clustered around old churches. Sheer cliffs and waterfalls carve Streymoy, the largest of the islands, where Torshavn is one of the world’s smallest capitals with about 12,400 inhabitants, plus another 5,000 living in the suburbs of Argir and Hoyvik. Visitors find interesting museums, churches, monuments and all the amenities of a modern town and thriving harbour here. The world’s oldest, still active parliament was founded in the Viking age. Today, it houses the main offices of the local government. Many of the attractions are found outside of Torshavn in the rugged beauty of Streymoy. There are fields with grazing ponies and sheep, tiny hamlets where residents live in half-timbered houses topped by green grass roofs, and dramatic rock formations. Birds by the thousands populate the craggy seaside cliffs, which make an ideal stopover for migratory gannets, guillemots and puffins. The Faroes' climate is generally wet and windy. Because of the Gulf Stream, the temperature is a good deal more moderate than the latitude might imply; it also helps to keep Faroe harbours ice-free year-round.
Heimaey Island, Iceland image
Day 9
Heimaey Island, Iceland
It’s hard to imagine, as you stroll Heimaey’s idyllic streets of white wooden houses, that this island was literally torn apart by a spectacular volcanic eruption, just over 40 years ago. The fact that you can visit incredible Heimaey at all is something of a miracle – because the oozing lava of the Eldfell volcano threatened to seal the harbour off completely. Fortunately, its advance was halted by gallons of seawater, pumped onto it by the plucky islanders, who saved their fishing industry in the process. Iceland's famous for its scenery, and the huge castles of volcanic rock that rise out of the sea's waves here are some of the country's most dramatic.
Reykjavík, Iceland image
Day 10
Reykjavík, Iceland
Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík. In AD 874, Norseman Ingólfur Arnarson saw Iceland rising out of the misty sea and came ashore at a bay eerily shrouded with plumes of steam from nearby hot springs. Today most of the houses in Reykjavík are heated by near-boiling water from the hot springs. Natural heating avoids air pollution; there's no smoke around. You may notice, however, that the hot water brings a slight sulfur smell to the bathroom.Prices are easily on a par with other major European cities. A practical option is to purchase a Reykjavík City Card at the Tourist Information Center or at the Reykjavík Youth Hostel. This card permits unlimited bus usage and admission to any of the city's seven pools, the Family Park and Zoo, and city museums. The cards are valid for one (ISK 3,300), two (ISK 4,400), or three days (ISK 4,900), and they pay for themselves after three or four uses a day. Even lacking the City Card, paying admission (ISK 500, or ISK 250 for seniors and people with disabilities) to one of the city art museums (Hafnarhús, Kjarvalsstaðir, or Ásmundarsafn) gets you free same-day admission to the other two.
Ship Details
HX Hurtigruten Expeditions
MS Maud
Formerly the MS Midnatsol, the MS Maud is well-suited for expedition cruising.
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