Singapore, Vietnam, Hong Kong & Taiwan to Tokyo

with stays in Singapore and Tokyo

Luxury Cruise & Stay Package

  • 2 spacious outdoor pools
  • Complimentary room service
  • Complimentary traditional Afternoon Tea
  • Cunard’s world-famous White Star service
  • Kids Zones and play areas - from tots to teens
  • Traditional Deck Games - lawn bowling, shuffleboard
  • 11 bars and lounges including the Winter Garden and Champagne Bar
  • Queens Room Ballroom - dance the night away to the live band’s tunes
  • Royal Court Theatre - from cabaret, comedy and music to West End-style shows

Bespoke Handcrafted Cruise & Stay Spring Flash Sale - book by 30th April & Save £50pp* & a reduced deposit!

Prices Available
11th March 2025
£3499
  • Departure Date: 11th March 2025
  • Total Nights: 21 Nights
  • Cruise: Queen Elizabeth
  • Package Type: Cruise and Stay
  • Includes Outbound Flight
  • Includes Inbound Flight
From
£3579 *pp
Cunard Line logo
Cunard Line

The age of elegance lives on aboard Cunard's impressive fleet, with white-gloved afternoon teas, grand staircases, exuberant cabins and formal galas in elegant restaurants.

Now that Cunard has observed the centenary of its pioneering world cruise, the famous mantra of dignified excellence has intensified to create not just one of the greatest cruise experiences, but the finest travel money can buy.

2081
Passengers
1005
Crew
2010
Launched
2016
Last refit
90900t
Tonnage
294m
Length
32m
Width
21kts
Speed
12
Decks
USD
Currency
Overview
  • done Return flights from the UK
  • done 15-night cruise
  • done 2-night stay in Singapore
  • done 2-night stay in Tokyo
  • done Transfers included
  • done Reduced deposit
  • done Exclusive savings
Cruise Itinerary
Day 1-2
Outbound flight from the UK to Singapore
Outbound flight from the UK to Singapore
Day 2-4
Singapore hotel stay
2-night Singapore hotel stay
Day 4
Embark and set sail
Embark at Singapore and set sail
Day 5-6
At sea
At sea
Day 7
Chan May
Chan May, Vietnam
Day 8
At sea
At sea
Day 9-10
Hong Kong - Overnight onboard
Hong Kong, China
Day 11
At sea
At sea
Day 12
Manila
Manila, the Philippines
Day 13
At sea
At sea
Day 14
Hualien
Hualien, Taiwan
Day 15
Keelung (Chilung)
Keelung (Chilung), Taiwan
Day 16
At sea
At sea
Day 17
Kagoshima
Kagoshima, Japan
Day 18
At sea
At sea
Day 19
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
Day 19-21
Tokyo hotel stay
2-night Tokyo hotel stay
Day 21-22
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Outbound flight from the UK to Singapore image
Day 1-2
Outbound flight from the UK to Singapore
Outbound flight from the UK to Singapore
Singapore hotel stay image
Day 2-4
Singapore hotel stay
2-night Singapore hotel stay
Embark and set sail image
Day 4
Embark and set sail

Spirited Singapore in Southeast Asia is the world’s only sovereign island city-state. The nation’s contemporary identity as a city-island hybrid stems from its colonial history as a British-controlled trading territory, founded by Sir Stamford Raffles in 1819. Today, an amalgamation of multiracial influences give rise to Singapore’s diverse culture - primarily a fusion of Malay, Indian, Chinese and Western traditions. This rich multiculturalism is one of Singapore’s top selling points, drawing in visitors from all over the world who are keen to explore the island’s divergent neighbourhoods, from the colourful pagodas of Chinatown to the ornate temples of Little India. Singapore’s natural landscape is as varied as its culture, with stark contrasts between the luscious, tropical Singapore Botanic Garden and the perfectly sculpted, futuristic “Supertrees” of Gardens by the Bay. A quirky mishmash of old and new, Singapore is without a doubt one of Asia’s most unique and memorable islands with which travellers cannot help but fall in love along a Singapore cruise.

At sea image
Day 5-6
At sea
At sea
Chan May image
Day 7
Chan May
Hue (pronounced hway), bisected by the Perfume River and 13 km (8 mi) inland from the South China Sea, in the foothills of the Annamite Mountains (Truong Son Mountains), stands as a reminder of Vietnam's imperial past. The seat of 13 Nguyen-dynasty emperors between 1802 and 1945, Hue was once Vietnam's splendid Imperial City. Although it was devastated by the French in the 19th century and again by fighting between the Vietnamese Communists and the Americans in the 20th, the monument-speckled former capital has a war-ravaged beauty. One can still imagine its former splendor, despite gaping holes in its silhouette. Hue is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the city's gems are slowly being restored.
At sea image
Day 8
At sea
At sea
Hong Kong - Overnight onboard image
Day 9-10
Hong Kong - Overnight onboard

Home to more than seven million people and with more skyscrapers than any other city on the planet, Hong Kong is a big dollop of frenetic energy. But there are also ancient monasteries, quiet fishing villages and green corners aplenty to quieten the mind when you need a break from the chaos. Part urban jungle, part spiritual hub and an indisputable noodle-mecca, the city is dissected by Victoria Harbour, studded with tiny wooden sampan boats, which serve as a daily reminder of Hong Kong’s rich seafaring past.

At sea image
Day 11
At sea
At sea
Manila image
Day 12
Manila

It might not rank quite as highly as the likes of Singapore or Hong Kong when it comes to the most popular ports of call on an Asia cruise, but Manila is an exciting and dynamic Asian metropolis that should not be overlooked. Visitors to Philippines’ capital will discover the rich history of its Spanish colonial past, still visible throughout the city, while enjoying the throng and excitement of the city’s teeming modern streets, complete with cultural centres, bars, clubs and restaurants. This is truly the city that never sleeps.

At sea image
Day 13
At sea
At sea
Hualien image
Day 14
Hualien
One of the world’s biggest producers of marble, Hualin is the largest city on the east coast of Taiwan. Sitting on the mountain-fringed plains just south of the Taroko Gorge, it is a great location from which to explore Taroko National Park.
Keelung (Chilung) image
Day 15
Keelung (Chilung)
With the glittering lights of Taipei - a futuristic metropolis of culture and ideas - sparkling nearby, Keelung is the first calling point for many visitors arriving in Taiwan. While this port city essentially serves as Taipei's ocean gateway, you shouldn’t be too hasty in dashing off to Taipei's neon-lit magic – first it’s well worth spending some time exploring the famous glowing night market, which hums with life each evening and is famous for its local seafood.
At sea image
Day 16
At sea
At sea
Kagoshima image
Day 17
Kagoshima
Kagoshima city is the capital of Kagoshima prefecture and also Kyushu’s southernmost major city. This city is often compared to its Italian sister city Naples, due to its’s similarities such as mild climate and active volcano, Sakurajima. Sakurajima is one of the most renowned active volcanos not only in Japan but also in the whole entire world. This smoking Sakurajima is centred in Kinko Bay and is one of the main symbols of this prefecture. We cannot talk about Sakurajima without the history of continuous eruption. Sakurajima used to be an isolated island; however, the land has banded together with Osumi peninsula from the eruption in 1914. You may have a chance to see the smoke coming from the top of Sakurajima depending on the weather condition. Not only does the scenery of Sakurajima represent the beauty of Kagoshima City but Senganen garden is also symbolic to elegance in the Kagoshima region. This Japanese garden was constructed by a feudal lord, Mitsuhisa Shimazu, as a guest house of the Kagoshima castle which attracts many visitors for its splendid view.
At sea image
Day 18
At sea
At sea
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa image
Day 19
Disembark at Tokyo / Yokohama, Kanagawa
In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.
Tokyo hotel stay image
Day 19-21
Tokyo hotel stay
In 1853, a fleet of four American warships under Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into the bay of Tokyo (then Edo) and presented the reluctant Japanese with the demands of the U.S. government for the opening of diplomatic and commercial relations. The following year Perry returned and first set foot on Japanese soil at Yokohama—then a small fishing village on the mudflats of Tokyo bay. Two years later New York businessman Townsend Harris became America's first diplomatic representative to Japan. In 1858 he was finally able to negotiate a commercial treaty between the two countries; part of the deal designated four locations—one of them Yokohama—as treaty ports. In 1859 the shogunate created a special settlement in Yokohama for the growing community of merchants, traders, missionaries, and other assorted adventurers drawn to this exotic new land of opportunity. The foreigners (predominantly Chinese and British, plus a few French, Americans, and Dutch) were confined here to a guarded compound about 5 square km (2 square miles)—placed, in effect, in isolation—but not for long. Within a few short years the shogunal government collapsed, and Japan began to modernize. Western ideas were welcomed, as were Western goods, and the little treaty port became Japan's principal gateway to the outside world. In 1872 Japan's first railway was built, linking Yokohama and Tokyo. In 1889 Yokohama became a city; by then the population had grown to some 120,000. As the city prospered, so did the international community and by the early 1900s Yokohama was the busiest and most modern center of international trade in all of East Asia. Then Yokohama came tumbling down. On September 1, 1923, the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated the city. The ensuing fires destroyed some 60,000 homes and took more than 40,000 lives. During the six years it took to rebuild the city, many foreign businesses took up quarters elsewhere, primarily in Kobe and Osaka, and did not return. Over the next 20 years Yokohama continued to grow as an industrial center—until May 29, 1945, when in a span of four hours, some 500 American B-29 bombers leveled nearly half the city and left more than half a million people homeless. When the war ended, what remained became—in effect—the center of the Allied occupation. General Douglas MacArthur set up headquarters here, briefly, before moving to Tokyo; the entire port facility and about a quarter of the city remained in the hands of the U.S. military throughout the 1950s. By the 1970s Yokohama was once more rising from the debris; in 1978 it surpassed Osaka as the nation's second-largest city, and the population is now inching up to the 3.5 million mark. Boosted by Japan's postwar economic miracle, Yokohama has extended its urban sprawl north to Tokyo and south to Kamakura—in the process creating a whole new subcenter around the Shinkansen Station at Shin-Yokohama. The development of air travel and the competition from other ports have changed the city's role in Japan's economy. The great liners that once docked at Yokohama's piers are now but a memory, kept alive by a museum ship and the occasional visit of a luxury vessel on a Pacific cruise. Modern Large as Yokohama is, the central area is very negotiable. As with any other port city, much of what it has to offer centers on the waterfront—in this case, on the west side of Tokyo Bay. The downtown area is called Kannai (literally, "within the checkpoint"); this is where the international community was originally confined by the shogunate. Though the center of interest has expanded to include the waterfront and Ishikawa-cho, to the south, Kannai remains the heart of town. Think of that heart as two adjacent areas. One is the old district of Kannai, bounded by Basha-michi on the northwest and Nippon-odori on the southeast, the Keihin Tohoku Line tracks on the southwest, and the waterfront on the northeast. This area contains the business offices of modern Yokohama. The other area extends southeast from Nippon-odori to the Moto-machi shopping street and the International Cemetery, bordered by Yamashita Koen and the waterfront to the northeast; in the center is Chinatown, with Ishikawa-cho Station to the southwest. This is the most interesting part of town for tourists. Whether you're coming from Tokyo, Nagoya, or Kamakura, make Ishikawa-cho Station your starting point. Take the South Exit from the station and head in the direction of the waterfront.
Return flight to the UK image
Day 21-22
Return flight to the UK
Return flight to the UK
Ship Details
Cunard Line
Queen Elizabeth

Join us on Queen Elizabeth and immerse yourself in her evocative art deco elegance. Our newest Queen exudes style and has an especially refined feel. Prepare yourself for a truly remarkable voyage.

Find your perfect cruise!
Your Hotel Stay

Vibe Hotel Singapore Orchard Or Similar

star star star star 4 star hotel
Total Nights: 2 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed by Iglu on booking

Metropolitan Tokyo Ikebukuro Or Similar

star star star star 4 star hotel
Total Nights: 2 Night Stay
Description:
The hotel will be confirmed by Iglu on booking
Flights Included

Outbound Flight

Departure Date:
11th March 2025
Location:
Outbound flight from London, UK to Singapore, Singapore

Inbound Flight

Arrival Date:
31st March 2025
Location:
Inbound flight from from Tokyo, Japan to London, UK
Customer Reviews
4.1
out of 62 customer reviews
Cruise Overall
4.3
Ship
4.3
Dining
4.3
Service Onboard
4.4
Accomodation
4.4
Public Rooms
4.3
Embark & Disembark
4.3
Shore Excursions
2.8
Value For Money
4.2

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